Past Events

  • Françoise Mouly: TOON Books and Young Readers May 20, 2013

    Wexner Center for the Arts
    May 20, 2013
     

    Françoise Mouly, the art editor at the New Yorkermagazine since 1993, discusses her efforts to promote literacy in children through such efforts as founding TOON Books, a series of hardcover comic books for children.

    Mouly has been a key figure in comics since the early 198-s. when she cofounded the alternative comics’ magazine RAW, which featured the work of Charles Burns, Gary Panter, and Chris Ware, to name just a few. In 2008, she launced TOON Books, with projects drawn by such acclaimed artists as Jeff Smith, Jay Lunch, Art Spiegelman, and Nadja Spiegelman (Mouly and Art Spiegelman’s daughter). The line of books have been a huge success with libraries, educators, and, most importantly, young readers.

    Presented by the Wexner Center for the Arts in conjunction with Ohio State’s Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum.

  • Art Spiegelman: Dick Tracy, Chester Gould, and More May 19, 2013

    Wexner Center for the Arts
    May 19, 2013
     

    Art Spiegelman shares his appreciation for comics’ most famous police detective, Dick Tracy, as well as the art of the character’s creator, Chester Gould, who wrote and drew the strip for more than four decades in this lecture.

    An expert on the history of his field, Spiegelman analyzes Gould’s work and places it within the greater context of comics’ history. His residency is a collaboration between the Wexner Center for the Arts and Ohio State’s Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum, and he intends to develop a new project based on research in the Cartoon Library & Museum’s collection.

    While you are here, check out the exhibition Dick Tracy: Chester Gould’s Blueprint Expressionism, on view May 2 – August 19 on view in the Cartoon Library & Museum Reading Room Gallery.

  • My Friend Dahmer My Friend Dahmer May 15, 2013

    Wexner Center for the Arts
    May 15, 2013
     

    Ohio State grad and Cleveland-based cartoonist Derf Backderf visits to discuss his new graphic novel, My Friend Dahmer, an account of growing up in the same small Ohio town as notorious serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer.

    Best known for his strip The City, Derf is a two-time Eisner Award nominee and received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism award in 2006. Join us following the event for a book signing in the Wexner Center Store.

    Cosponsored by the Wexner Center for the Arts and Ohio State’s Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum.

  • Oulipo Workshop with Matt Madden Oulipo Workshop with Matt Madden May 12, 2013

    Wexner Center for the Arts
    May 12, 2013
     

    Cartoonist Matt Madden, creator of 99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style, leads this workshop that shows you how to utilize the principles of Oulipo to create cartoons under artistic constraints.

    The rules, or constraints, can be simple or complicated, silly or willfully perverse: Maybe each panel would show a close-up of a hand, or zoom in on a single object? Or maybe the comic would be readable in more than one direction? This practice of using constraints to spark creativity connects to a vanguard French literary group whose name, Oulipo, comes from a phrase, Ouvroir de Littérature Potentielle, that translates loosely to “workshop for potential literature.”

    No prior experience is necessary, and materials will be provided. Advance registration is required and space is limited. Register here.

    Call (614) 292-6493 for more info.

    Cosponsored by Ohio State’s Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum and the Wexner Center for the Arts

  • Obstacle Course: Oulipo and the Creative Potential of Constraints Obstacle Course: Oulipo and the Creative Potential of Constraints May 11, 2013

    Wexner Center for the Arts
    May 11, 2013
     

    Cartoonist Matt Madden, creator of 99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style, talks about his work and how the arbitrary constraints of Oulipo have produced great art in all kinds of media.

    Do you think you could make a comic where each panel would only show an extreme close-up of a hand? Or where each panel zooms in closer to a single object? A comic that you can read in more than one direction? Many great works of art begin from willfully perverse constraints or rules such as these. Drawing not just from comics but from literature, film, and music—both popular and experimental—Madden describes the lineage of creativity first identified by Oulipo, a French literary group whose name translates loosely to “workshop for potential literature.”

    Cosponsored by the Wexner Center for the Arts and the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum.

  • 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19