Current Events

  • Cartoon Crossroads Columbus (CXC) Cartoon Crossroads Columbus (CXC) September 28, 2017 - October 1, 2017

    SAVE THE DATE! Cartoon Crossroads Columbus (CXC) is a multi-facted, yearly festival celebrating comics and cartooning, the city of Columbus and cartoonists worldwide. For 2017, the festival will run from September 28 – October 1.

  • Save the Date! Exhibition Reception and 40th Anniversary Celebration | May 1, 2017 Save the Date! Exhibition Reception and 40th Anniversary Celebration | May 1, 2017 May 1, 2017

    On May 1, 1977, the Milton Caniff Reading Room was officially dedicated and opened to researchers. Join us for a special celebration, exactly 40 years later! Events are FREE and open to the public. More details coming soon.

  • Tom Spurgeon | We Told You So: Comics as Art Tom Spurgeon | We Told You So: Comics as Art April 11, 2017

    It’s hard to imagine the field of comics being as diverse and vibrant as it is today without publisher Fantagraphics Books. Founded in 1976 by Gary Groth and Mike Catron (joined by the late Kim Thompson in 1977), Fantagraphics began by publishing the collector’s magazine Amazing Heroes before beginning to publish comics in 1979. During its existence, the company has published and championed such alternative comics greats as Dan Clowes, the Hernandez Brothers, Jessica Abel, and Charles Burns, along with reprints of classic comics and the influential The Comics Journal. In We Told You So: Comics as Art, comics historian and critic Tom Spurgeon (along with co-author Michael Dean) provide an oral history of the influential company, exploring not only the business side of the operation but the broader movement and acceptance of comics as an art form during the past 40 years. Those interviewed include a “Who’s Who” of American comics including Art Spiegelman, Stan Lee, Frank Miller, Dave Sim, Jim Shooter and more.

  • Michael Tisserand | Krazy: George Herriman, A Life in Black and White Michael Tisserand | Krazy: George Herriman, A Life in Black and White March 28, 2017

    In print from 1913 – 1944, George Herriman’s Krazy Kat newspaper strip is among the most celebrated and revered in comics history. Although not terribly popular with the general public, Herriman’s blend of visual poetry and surrealistic settings inspired an animated series, a ballet, and made it a favorite among intellectuals around the world (as well as publisher William Randolph Hearst who liked it so much he supported Herriman and the strip until the artist died.)

    Herriman was born in New Orleans in 1880 to mixed race parents. Though his birth certificate said “Colored”, Herriman lived his life as a white man. In his much anticipated biography, Krazy, Michael Tisserand examines the role race played in Herriman’s life and the fascinating and subtle ways that questions of race were addressed in his work.