Past Exhibits

  • Drawn On Stone: Political Prints from the 1830s and 1840s Drawn On Stone: Political Prints from the 1830s and 1840s March 19, 2010 - December 19, 2010

    Philip Sills Gallery
    March 19, 2010 – December 19, 2010
     

    Drawn on Stoneexplores American political cartooning during the tumultuous Jacksonian era. The exhibition features thirty rare satirical lithographs recently acquired by the Cartoon Research Library with help from the William J. Studer endowment. This extraordinary collection illustrates the surge in the creation and distribution of political cartoon broadsides made possible by the relative ease and speed of the new print-making process of lithography. Several cartoons not found in other major print collections are included.

    Like their contemporary counterparts, early nineteenth-century cartoonists used satire, symbols, metaphors and references to popular literature and theater to comment on domestic policy and world events, to expose greed and corruption in the government, to sway voters during an election, and to criticize the administration for conducting a costly and unpopular war.

    Drawn on Stone is curated by Jenny E. Robb, Visiting Assistant Curator at the Cartoon Research Library.

  • Winsor McCay: Legendary Cartoonist Winsor McCay: Legendary Cartoonist September 15, 2009 - December 31, 2009

    The Reading Room Gallery
    September 15, 2009 – December 31, 2009

    Winsor McCay was an unusually prolific cartoonist. More than thirty comic strip titles and ten animated films are credited to him. The decade between 1903 and 1913 was his most creative period. His biographer, John Canemaker, states, “…when the American comic strip was in its infancy, McCay became the first master of the form with two unsurpassed works of genius, Dream of the Rarebit Fiend…and Little Nemo in Slumberland.” In addition, McCay was an important pioneer animator and a popular vaudeville performer.

    The date and place of McCay’s birth are unknown. He grew up in Michigan and was self-taught. He created his first comic strip, A Tale of the Jungle Imps by Felix Fiddle, for the Cincinnati Enquirer in 1903. McCay soon left for New York City where he worked for James Gordon Bennett and later for William Randolph Hearst. Although his comic strips were formulaic, the sureness of his hand and the beauty of his drawings continue to delight. McCay’s interest in depicting movement is apparent throughout his comic strips, so it is not surprising that he found the new medium of animation intriguing.

    In 1913, William Randolph Hearst ordered McCay to draw nothing but editorial illustrations. This constraint leaves contemporary students of McCay’s work puzzled. What might he have accomplished if he had devoted the last twenty years of his life to animation or comic strips? Winsor McCay:  Legendary Cartoonist invites visitors to consider this question as they enjoy superb examples of McCay’s work that span his career.

  • From Yellow Kid to Conan: American Cartoons from the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection June 28, 2009 - August 7, 2009

    Hopkins Hall Corridor
    June 28, 2009 – August 7, 2009

    As the old saw goes, timing is everything.

    Mort Walker had a dream of a bona fide museum that exhibited original cartoon art.  Hard work and ingenuity turned a mansion into a museum in 1974. More hard work and ingenuity turned a concrete castle into a second home for their museum. Its third incarnation as the International Museum of Cartoon Art (IMCA) in Boca Raton, Florida, seemed to be the dream come true, but economic realities intervened. Despite the challenges during these years, the museum’s collection, thousands of priceless original cartoons from around the world as well as books and artifacts related to all of the genres of cartoon art, grew and flourished.

    Concurrent with the museum’s development, a cartoon library was growing at The Ohio State University. It began in two classrooms off the back hallway of the Journalism Building in 1977. Soon it expanded to three classrooms and officialy became part of the University Libraries. When the three classrooms were filled a dozen years later, the library moved into much larger space. In subsequent years, additions to its holdings expanded the collection so much that the use of off-site storage was required.

    By 2006 it was clear that provisions had to be made for additional space for the cartoon library and a possible lead donor stepped forward. After two feasibility studies, university officials decided that the cartoon library should have a new home, complete with museum-quality galleries, in Sullivant Hall, a historic building at the gateway to campus. The opportunity to merge the International Museum of Cartoon Art (IMCA) Collection with the library presented itself because of the additional storage space and galleries that will be available in Sullivant Hall. We are grateful that Mort Walker and the IMCA board accepted our invitation and agreed to transfer its treasures to The Ohio State University. In recognition of its expanded responsibility to exhibit original cartoon art, the name of the library was changed to Cartoon Library and Museum in December 2008. It is fitting that one of the galleries in Sullivant Hall will be named in honor of Mort Walker.

    The opening of this exhibit will be celebrated with a reception from 3:30-5:00 pm at the Hopkins Hall Gallery + Corridor in conjunction with the opening of Hogarth and Beyond: Global Cartoons from the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection. Refreshments will be served. Free and open to the public.

    The exhibit is open from 10:30 am – 4:30 pm weekdays.

  • Hogarth and Beyond: Global Cartoons from the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection Hogarth and Beyond: Global Cartoons from the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection June 10, 2009 - August 31, 2009

    The Reading Room Gallery
    June 10, 2009 – August 31, 2009
     

    As the old saw goes, timing is everything.

    Mort Walker had a dream of a bona fide museum that exhibited original cartoon art.  Hard work and ingenuity turned a mansion into a museum in 1974. More hard work and ingenuity turned a concrete castle into a second home for their museum. Its third incarnation as the International Museum of Cartoon Art (IMCA) in Boca Raton, Florida, seemed to be the dream come true, but economic realities intervened. Despite the challenges during these years, the museum’s collection, thousands of priceless original cartoons from around the world as well as books and artifacts related to all of the genres of cartoon art, grew and flourished.

    Concurrent with the museum’s development, a cartoon library was growing at The Ohio State University. It began in two classrooms off the back hallway of the Journalism Building in 1977. Soon it expanded to three classrooms and officialy became part of the University Libraries. When the three classrooms were filled a dozen years later, the library moved into much larger space. In subsequent years, additions to its holdings expanded the collection so much that the use of off-site storage was required.

    By 2006 it was clear that provisions had to be made for additional space for the cartoon library and a possible lead donor stepped forward. After two feasibility studies, university officials decided that the cartoon library should have a new home, complete with museum-quality galleries, in Sullivant Hall, a historic building at the gateway to campus. The opportunity to merge the International Museum of Cartoon Art (IMCA) Collection with the library presented itself because of the additional storage space and galleries that will be available in Sullivant Hall. We are grateful that Mort Walker and the IMCA board accepted our invitation and agreed to transfer its treasures to The Ohio State University. In recognition of its expanded responsibility to exhibit original cartoon art, the name of the library was changed to Cartoon Library and Museum in December 2008. It is fitting that one of the galleries in Sullivant Hall will be named in honor of Mort Walker.

    The works in this exhibit are a fraction of the many thousands of works in the IMCA Collection, which includes a wide range of cartoon art from around the world. During the museum’s years in Boca Raton, Florida, board member Jerry Robinson was especially active in building its holdings of cartoons by contemporary international cartoonists. We salute the perseverance and dedication of everyone who worked to make the International Museum of Cartoon Art a reality. The International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection, which is their legacy, will be the source of great pleasure and inspiration for decades to come.

    The opening of this exhibit will be celebrated with a reception from 3:30-5:00 pm at the Hopkins Hall Gallery + Corridor in conjunction with the opening of Yellow Kid to Conan: American Cartoons from the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection. Refreshments will be served. Free and open to the public.

  • Light: A Forgotten 19th Century Humor Magazine Light: A Forgotten 19th Century Humor Magazine April 9, 2009 - May 31, 2009

    The Reading Room Gallery
    April 9, 2009 – May 31, 2009

    Light was by far the most important of lithographic comic weekly to be published outside of New York or San Francisco during the last quarter of the nineteenth century.  It provided the first or early employment to a host of talented cartoonists, illustrators, and at least one writer who would later go on to successful careers.  Those who contributed to Light included Will H. Bradley, W. W. Denslow, Frank Ladendorf, Ferand Lungren, Hy Mayer, Peter Newell, T. E. Powers, C. S. Rigby, and Horace Taylor.  It also published the works of prominent New York cartoonists, such as Eugene Zimmerman and F. M. Howarth.

    During its bumpy two-and-a-half year existence, the magazine’s one constant was change: it changed its name, its place of publication, its size and appearance, and its owners, editors, and chief cartoonists.  It began in Columbus in March 1889 as The Owl.  It changed its name to Light in June and suspended publication in September.  It was revived in Chicago in February of 1890, went full-color in May, increased its page size in September, and published its final issue in June 1891.

    Why Light is unknown today is due to its rarity.  Until recently, the Library of Congress held the only set and it is incomplete. For more than a century, the objects in this exhibition languished in the basement of the Chicago-area home owned by Philo C. Darrow, the magazine’s art director and editor.  The current owners of the home decided to sell the archive in early 2008 and the library acquired it shortly thereafter.  While some of the objects may be a bit worse for wear, the quality of both the original cartoons and the magazine itself is without question.

    On April 9, the Cartoon Library & Museum will partner with the Aldus Society, a Central Ohio group devoted to books and the printed arts, to sponsor a lecture about Light by Richard Samuel West, an independent scholar and historian who is an expert in the history of nineteenth century American editorial cartoons.  The program will be Thursday, April 9, 2009, at 7:30 p.m. at The Thurber Center, 91 Jefferson Avenue, Columbus, OH.  The event is free and open to the public.  Socializing begins at 7:00 p.m. and allows members and guests the opportunity to discuss among themselves their book interests and latest finds.

    The exhibition Light:  A Forgotten 19th Century Humor Magazine is co-curated by Richard West and Lucy Shelton Caswell, Professor and Curator of the Cartoon Library & Museum.

     

  • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10